La boutique électroacoustique

Artistes Randall Smith

Randall Smith a d’abord composé pour des cinéastes de Toronto, sa ville natale, qui réalisaient des films expérimentaux. Fleeting Wheels of Changes, sa première pièce solo pour bande, remonte à 1987. Par la suite et jusqu’en 1995, Randall Smith composera uniquement de la musique électroacoustique. Il entreprend des études en violon en 1992, avec Eugene Kash, ignorant à ce moment que cela l’amènerait à composer des œuvres pour instruments et bande (musique électroacoustique mixte). En 1995, après sa rencontre avec le violoncelliste Daniel Domb, il compose Continental Rift, sa première pièce mixte pour violoncelle et bande. Par la suite, Randall Smith a composé diverses pièces mixtes.

Les œuvres de Randall Smith ont été présentées au Canada, en Europe, en Asie, en Amérique du Sud et aux États-Unis d’Amérique. Il a obtenu les prix suivants: 1er prix du jury et 1er prix du public, au Concours Noroit-Léonce Petitot (Arras, France, 1996); Prix du public et 1er et 2e prix au Concours Luigi-Russolo (Varèse, Italie, 1993, 1995); Prix GMEM (Marseilles, France, 1993); ainsi que deux mentions au Concours de Bourges (France, 1993, 1997). Des subventions lui ont été accordées par le Conseil des art du Canada, le Conseil des arts de l’Ontario et le Toronto Arts Council. Lui ont passé des commandes entre autres l’ACREQ, le Canadian Electronic Ensemble, Continuum, la percussionniste Beverly Johnston et l’accordéoniste Joseph Petric ainsi que Réseaux. L’on a pu entendre la musique de Randall Smith dans L’oreille voit et Sondes (tous deux sur étiquette empreintes DIGITALes), de même que dans quelques disques de compilation.

En 1998, Randall Smith commence à étudier le tar, un instrument à cordes iranien, auprès d’Ahmad Ashraf-Abadi dont il utilisera ensuite l’approche, combinée avec des idées musicales d’autres cultures, pour créer de nouvelles œuvres. Randall Smith, aujourd’hui compositeur à temps plein, produit sa musique dans son propre studio, à Toronto.

[xii-99]

Randall Smith

Windsor (Ontario, Canada), 1960

Résidence: Toronto (Ontario, Canada)

  • Compositeur
  • Journaliste

Sur le web

Randall Smith, photo: André Pierre Leduc, Toronto (Ontario, Canada), 1999

Œuvres choisies

Parutions principales

Apparitions

Artistes divers
Artistes divers
Artistes divers

Compléments

Artistes divers
  • Épuisé
Artistes divers
  • Hors-catalogue
Artistes divers
  • Hors-catalogue

Folio

La presse en parle

Portrait

François Couture, All-Music Guide, 13 septembre 2001

Randall Smith is one of the lesser-known Canadian electroacoustic composers — and it’s a shame. His music surely equals the one of Gilles Gobeil or Robert Normandeau. Fascinated by the cinematographic possibilities of acousmatic art, Smith approaches the genre with a lack of pomposity and a playfulness that make his works particularly suitable for newcomers to musique concrète and its derivatives.

Smith was born in the industrial city of Windsor (Ontario, Canada). He started his career as a composer through collaborations with dancers and film makers in Toronto. His discovery of the music created at the Groupe de recherches musicales (GRM) in Paris prompted a decisive shift and from 1987 to 1995 he created acousmatic music exclusively. His first solo CD L’oreille voit (“The Ear Sees,” the title being by itself a good indication of his artistic goal), released on the prestigious label empreintes DIGITALes, in 1994 eloquently summarizes this period.

In 1992, Smith began to take violin lessons with Eugene Kash. This would soon lead him to create mixed electroacoustic music (works for instruments and tape). His first (and very impressive) attempts in this direction can be heard on his second album, Sondes (1999), including Convergence, the piece he wrote for virtuoso accordionist Joseph Petric.

He has won his share of prizes at international competitions and received grants from Canadian governmental councils, but he can hardly be seen as a careerist or an administrator, unlike many other electroacoustic composers. The late 1990s saw Smith becoming interested in Middle-Eastern folkloric music. He studied the tar with Ahmad Ashraf-Abadi.

Smith approaches the genre with a lack of pomposity and a playfulness that make his works particularly suitable for newcomers to musique concrète…

Smith Wins Noroit Prize

Rick MacMillan, SOCAN, Words & Music, 1 avril 1996

Randall Smith of Toronto has been awarded both the first Jury Prize and the Public Prize in the 1996 International Noroit Acousmatic Music Competition in Arras, France. Each prize is valued at $3,000. Smith’s work Elastic Rebound was picked from a field of 81 entries. Fellow Canadians Ned Bouhalassa and Marc Tremblay were also among the seven finalists.

Articles écrits

  • Randall Smith, The WholeNote, no 7:5, 1 février 2002
    If I were asked to recommend a single CD to introduce one’s ear to the world of musique concrète, I would say Cycle du son.

Review

Randall Smith, The WholeNote, no 7:5, 1 février 2002

Recollecting a sonic spirit that has evolved over 50 years of imagining, visioning and sensing, Francis Dhomont’s new CD Cycle du son takes us back to the roots of an unusual art form and returns us to the here and now, intact and enlightened. We are summoned by the jolt, forced to hear the distinctive characteristics of musique concrète of old before being led confidently into the present. After all, the first composition Objets retrouvés is a memorial to one of the inventors of the medium, Pierre Schaeffer.

Collectively the four compositions included here provide a sonic history of acousmatic art. The classic sounds are intertwined and juxtaposed with new inventions providing a palette of rich colours and dynamic tones.

Francis Dhomont, who divides his time between his native France and Canada, delicately weaves a kaleidoscope of sound objects, evolving fluidly and freely through a maze of juxtapositions and contrasts. From the waves of an ocean to the ripple created by a single drop of water he dramatically takes the listener through an experience that is both terrifying and serene. Dhomont’s skillful resources do not end with capturing the sound abjects themselves, however; even with such complex and dynamic sound material his attention to pitch relation and form leaves one firmly convinced of his mastery.

If I were asked to recommend a single CD to introduce one’s ear to the world of musique concrète, I would say Cycle du son. What Pierre Schaeffer revolutionized in France, Francis Dhomont continues to explore to new heights and this is a CD about which I can say without reserve, everything works.

If I were asked to recommend a single CD to introduce one’s ear to the world of musique concrète, I would say Cycle du son.

Blogue