La boutique électroacoustique

Morphogenèse Erik Nyström

… their interior lives bleeding into infinity as our own universe is condensed into one of many microdots that go pinging off your shiny surfaces and windows.

— Gunter Heidegger, The Sound Projector, 29 juillet 2016

This was very enjoyable, and the kind of album that will always reward another listen.

— Martin P, Musique Machine, 16 juin 2016

Stéréo

  • 44 kHz, 16 bits

Stéréo

  • 44 kHz, 16 bits

• MP3 • OGG • FLAC

Morphogenèse

Erik Nyström

Quelques articles recommandés

Notes de programme

À propos de ce disque…

Les œuvres regroupées sur ce disque partagent une même motivation esthétique, soit l’idée d’une musique produisant ses propres formes dans le tissage constant de la trame spatiale. Cette idée s’incarne d’une manière évidente dans la manière dont les sons se regroupent et forment des textures qui, telles des topologies élastiques, se tordent pour adopter des formes, ou encore sont laissées à elles-mêmes et poursuivent une existence amorphe dans laquelle se manifestent souvent des suggestions de matérialité physique ou de vie biologique. Des perspectives spatiales apparaissent au fil des orbites et des déformations de ces textures, dans les territoires rapprochés et éloignés de l’image. Une dimension verticale prend corps lorsque les nuages se stratifient, s’étirent ou glissent à diverses altitudes du spectre. En ce sens, on peut percevoir la trame comme une expérience mentale visuelle de foyers, de périphéries, de teints et d’opacités, cumulés en une topographie où la spatialité au présent s’amalgame aux chemins vers l’avant. On peut même ressentir l’impression physique de traverser ces territoires. Chaque œuvre est une distorsion dans un monde en genèse perpétuelle, où l’auditeur représente la seule présence humaine, aventurier cosmique transporté à travers les étranges dimensions d’un multivers éphémère.

Quatre des morceaux (Catabolisms, Latitudes, Lucent Voids et Cataract) ont connu une première vie comme pièces de concert à diffusion sur huit canaux; j’ai créé les présentes versions stéréophoniques pour faciliter leur écoute à la maison.

Erik Nyström [traduction française: François Couture, vi-14]

La presse en parle

Review

Gunter Heidegger, The Sound Projector, 29 juillet 2016

‘Music that produces its own forms in the continual weaving of a spatial fabric’ is how Swedish sound engineer and electroacoustician Erik Nyström likens ‘his’ music to seemingly arbitrary cosmogonic forces as they pass almost accidentally through humanly appreciable forms. Something of a Serious Seeker of ‘spatial textures in acousmatic music’, the dazzling descriptions of his four compositions don’t quite deliver the shock of primordial violence I’m somehow expecting, though I do get the feeling that these pieces are quite happy to be left to their own devices.

Like a vague approximation of the Lorenz Attractor, the resounding void of Latitudes mutates like the weather filmed in time lapse, shifting too rapidly for our deep inner peace yet glazed with smoother surfaces than your usual jump-cut sound-editing shenanigans. This sounds quite typical of the empreintes DIGITALes establishment: sci-fi space-scapes and processed sounds turned inside out; their interior lives bleeding into infinity as our own universe is condensed into one of many microdots that go pinging off your shiny surfaces and windows.

Lucent Voids adds squelches of mechanised bird twitter and virtual reality sea spray to this vertiginous feat of sonic telescoping, but with a little more rough-housing before the end of the rainbow. Unsurprisingly, Cataract is of the same stratosphere, providing similarly psychotropic scenery and eventual pre-landing disillusion. While far from bucking this trend, Far-from-equilibrium is a sort of hapless A.I. accident that might have bubbled out from a table-top improviser’s set of material-testing stretch and strain. The most dynamically vivid of the four pieces, it seems designed to disorient the listener into seeking respite back at the start of the CD, where things are unlikely to have remained the way they were.

… their interior lives bleeding into infinity as our own universe is condensed into one of many microdots that go pinging off your shiny surfaces and windows.

Review

Martin P, Musique Machine, 16 juin 2016

Here’s an unusually packaged CD, wrapped in layers of entangled card inlays. Pulled apart, they reveal an outer card slipcase, an inner card inlay — both covered in texts and largely abstract imagery — and an odd little piece of card that holds the CD itself. The texts reveal recording details, as well as annotating the pieces themselves, of which there are five. The tracks, all recorded between 2008 and 2012, vary in length from around twelve minutes to over twenty. All five are rigorous, ‘hard-boiled’ electroacoustic works.

I’m not going to pretend to remotely encapsulate what goes in Morphogenèse; given the lengths of the individual pieces, and the sheer amount packed into them, I will instead offer up some highlights and more general thoughts. As I said above, the album compiles five serious electroacoustic works, constantly shifting and developing. The first track, Catabolisms, doesn’t start off too staggeringly; however, before long, it establishes a very nice drone. This disappears into a section that sounds simultaneously like a sci-fi spaceship, and something more organic — rocks and water. The sci-fi atmosphere is also found in the ominous drones that underpin some of the tracks, as well as the ‘digital’ feel that pervades most of the album. Later, near the close of the track, the sounds quickly combust/rot to a deathly hush — it’s a really nice transition between sections. Latitudes, the second piece, is perhaps best represented by the snaking, strained, whistling drone that dominates the early sections. The next track, Lucent Voids, begins with a soundscape that seems to summon water movements and bird-song, before adding bell-like sounds and hard, spacey tones. After the 16-minute mark, there’s a sudden, outbreak of near-melodicism, with a section that lurches like court music from some alien civilisation. In the context of the album as a whole, this is quite a startling moment for the ear, and all the better for it. The fourth piece, Cataract, is perhaps more low-key, less showy in tone than it’s previous counterparts, often burbling along quite quietly. Though there are still points of darkness and near-whiteout. Far-from-equilibrium, the final piece (and oldest), might be my favourite track on Morphogenèse. It seems to carry a more visceral, even aggressive, selection of sounds than the other pieces. It also has sounds that are much less processed, even near-raw, and these add great colour in terms of texture and movement. There are some fantastic moments where Nyström pulls sounds inside out, tearing and straining them — it’s compelling and beautiful.

Like I said above, Morphogenèse is not a release suited to a short review — it’s arguably not really an album that I’m overly ‘qualified’ to give much insight to, given it’s clear academic designs. However, there is a wealth of material here to digest and peruse, all of which demands close listening. I’ll admit that the prevailing ‘digital’ feel to the sounds is not to my particular tastes, but Far-from-equilibrium, where this effect is less pronounced, more than makes up for this. This was very enjoyable, and the kind of album that will always reward another listen.

This was very enjoyable, and the kind of album that will always reward another listen.

Review

Vito Camarretta, Chain DLK, 10 mars 2016

British[-based] computer composer Erik Nyström seems to focus more on the process of making a shape than the shape itself in the explorations that got collected in Morphogenèse; the explanation of a process could be more or less an easy task, but rendering it by means of sounds is much more engaging and troublesome, but Erik managed to walk over this arduous and somehow trackless path by means of riveting sonic strategies, that he developed within pertaining conceptual field. A sort of elastic noise is the sparkle of the opening Catabolisms, whose thrilling sequence of aggregating and disgregating textures really mirrors the description of catabolic processes by German art theorist and perceptual psychologist Rudolf Arnheim in his essay Entropy and Art (“all sorts of agents and events that act in an unpredictable, disorderly fashion and have in common the fact that they all grind things into pieces.”), referred in the introduction of the track, which gradually reaches a sort of point of no return, where the breaking of all chemical bonding and the bursts of energy that followed each step of these catabolic processes pushes listener close to a sort of nowhere; similarly, a sonic sparkle — the elongation of a pure frequency of a sort of diapason — ignites the following Latitudes, a track which manages to evoke a generative process of gradual expansion that begins with a compressed sonic corpuscle. Lucent Voids, the longest composition of this collection, sounds like an unpredictable game, whose aim is the modelling and the thinning of the diaphragm between time and space, while Erik seems to add film and sheers to pure sounds on the track Cataract in order to render the analogy with the medical condition of the eye lens as well as the Greek etymology of the term “acousmatic” — its origin can be traced back to Pythagoras and should derive from the term akousmatikoi, the outer circle of the disciples of the Greek philosopher who could hear the lessons of their teacher, who spoke from behind a veil so that his presence could not distract them from the content of his lessons. These four pieces are stereo versions (for home listening) of pieces that were originally conceived for 8-channel concert projections, while “Far-from-equilibrium” — an impressive electroacoustic translation of almost randomly self-generating entropic sonic entities and textures — comes from a stereo tape. A pair of really good headphones is highly recommended.

… an impressive electroacoustic translation of almost randomly self-generating entropic sonic entities and textures…

Avaruusromua: Täysin kuuntelijan vastuulla…

Jukka Mikkola, Yle Radio 1, 10 décembre 2015

[…]

Ruotsalaissyntyinen, mutta tätä nykyä Lontoossa asuva Erik Nyström on sitä mieltä, että musiikki tuottaa kehittyessään ja rakentuessaan itse omat muotonsa. Hän puhuu fyysisen materian ja biologisen elämän suhteesta. Hän puhuu todellisuuden kudelmasta, joka muokkautuu kaiken aikaa. Näkökulmat, etäisyydet ja näkymät muuttuvat jatkuvasti. Maailma ja äänet elävät.

Tämän sävellyksen yhteydessä tekijä puhuu siitä, kuinka meidän kokemuksemme nykyhetkestä on elastinen. Hän kirjoittaa siitä, kuinka meidän havaintomme todellisuudesta ovat epävarmoja ja muuttuvaisia.

[…]

Maailma ja äänet elävät.

Review

Klaus Boss, Bitchslap Magazine, 1 novembre 2015
A beginning of a rewarding musical aquaintance.

Critique

Fabrice Vanoverberg, Le son du grisli, 5 juin 2015

Au premier abord, l’acousmatique d’Erik Nyström ne sort guère de l’ordinaire, pour autant que ce terme puisse être appliqué à une sortie du merveilleux label canadien Empreintes DIGITALes. Chemin faisant, et passées les premières minutes, Morphogenèse subjugue par ses innombrables variations, complètement à l’opposé d’une vision où les drones se noient dans la monotonie.

Tel un Markus Schmickler qui extirperait l’ombre de Fennesz sous le manteau de Robert Normandeau, l’œuvre du compositeur basé à Londres exploite à merveille une foule de registres des musiques électroniques abstraites, et sa force de conviction est telle qu’on se laisse emporter sans le moindre détour. Leçon numéro deux: aux trente premières secondes d’un disque, tu ne t’arrêteras pas.

Chemin faisant, et passées les premières minutes, Morphogenèse subjugue par ses innombrables variations, complètement à l’opposé d’une vision où les drones se noient dans la monotonie.

Review

Simon Cummings, 5:4, 5 juin 2015

Morphogenèse, featuring music by Swedish composer Erik Nyström. Permeating all five pieces on this disc is an overt sense of evolution, as though the music was changing shape and manner in real-time as we listen. In Latitudes, everything begins from a simple bell strike, its resonance (which, although not always obviously, remains throughout) leading to a plethora of developments that, parallel to the notion of evolution, also suggest a sense of moving ever closer to something, in the process discerning increasing amounts of surface detail. The rather gorgeous sheen of this piece makes the effect hypnotic, but in works like Far-From-Equilibrium and Catabolisms Nyström’s concern is with sounds altogether more granular and fragmented. Yet these are moulded and compacted into startlingly present episodes where the music, bristling with organic energy, appears to muscle its way beyond the confines of the loudspeakers. Lucent Voids, at 20 minutes the longest work on the disc, makes both the deepest and most long-lasting impression. It could be heard as a synthesis or a summation of the other four works, embracing granular textures, extended pitch resonances, burly inner movement and gradual transitions of forms. But it transcends all of this, Nyström constructing a vast dramatic canvas that begins in the depths, passing through a hectic interplay of pitch and noise, and a number of increasingly vertiginous high points, to a place of genuine grandiosity, enveloping us in layer upon layer of highly variegated seams of material, dissipating into something resembling the crackle of vinyl mixed with an excited Geiger counter drenched by falling rain. Absolutely breathtaking.

Absolutely breathtaking.

Kritik

Ingo J Biermann, Nordische Musik, 15 mai 2015

Zur leichten Unterhaltung eignen sich die Arbeiten Erik Nyströms nicht, so viel ist schnell klar. Der 1978 im nordschwedischen Luleå geborene Klangkünstler promovierte 2013 an der City University London mit seiner praktischen und theoretischen Forschungsarbeit »Topology of Spatial Texture in the Acousmatic Medium«. Wenn Sie diese Begriffe nun erst nachschlagen müssen: Keine Sorge, Nyströms Ambition ist sicher nicht, uns seine Ideen auf dem Silbertablett darzureichen. Grob gesagt geht es Nyström um das Verhältnis von klanglicher Textur im Raum, weshalb vier dieser fünf Stücke für 8-kanalige Installationen konzipiert wurden und eigens für diese CD-Veröffentlichung in Stereoversionen gemischt wurden. Die zwischen 2008 und 2012 in London entstandenen Arbeiten sind zumeist 12 bis 14 Minuten lang, mit dem knapp 21-minütigen»Lucent Voids«im Zentrum.

Praktisch und anregend, dass »MORPHOGENÈSE« ausführliche Erläuterungen zu den Tracks beigefügt sind. Diese kryptischen Texte zu durchdringen erweist sich freilich als kaum geringere Herausforderung als die Klangkunstwerke selbst. Man sollte mit der Materie am besten schon etwas vertraut sein; dann hat man umso größeren Genuss beim Erfahren der ambitionierten Soundwelten, denen man den langwierigen und mühsamen Arbeitsprozess anhört — ohne dass der unangenehme Eindruck von Effektposerei entstünde. Vielmehr bietet Nyström elaborierte Exkursionen in Makro- und Mikrokosmos, in Moleküle und Welten, in Zeit und Zeitlosigkeit. Grafische Strukturen wie physikalische Skalen und Größen spielen (natürlich) eine Rolle, aber auch das Miteinander von konkreten, klaren und unförmigen bis abstrakten Elementen. Nach dem hingebungsvollen Durcharbeiten dieser Essenz von Erik Nyströms Doktorarbeit fühlt man sich ein wenig erschlagen und offen für ein leichteres musikalisches Dessert. Doch beim nächsten Mal kann man die elektroakustische Suite auch einfach mal als abendfüllende, atmosphärische Klanginstallation fürs Wohnzimmer goutieren. So lange der Künstler selbst keine Einwände hat.

Kritik

Rigobert Dittmann, Bad Alchemy, no 85, 1 mai 2015

Erik Nyström ist wohl der erste Schwede auf empreintes DIGITALes, was er seinem Doktorvater Denis Smalley verdankt, aber vor allem der Qualität von akusmatischen Klangverwirbelungen, wie sie auf Morphogenèse (IMED 14129) erklingen. Die knatternden Partikelstürme von Catabolisms gehen zurück auf die ‘anabolischen Tendenzen’, von denen der Kunstpsychologe Rudolf Arnheim (1904-2007) in seinem Essay Entropy and Art ausging. Dabei teilen sich die auf­bauenden Kräfte den Raum auf de-konstruktive Weise mit krisenträchtigen und katabolischen. Latitudes ist ein oszillierend zirpendes und brodelndes Klang­beben, eine sirrende Flatterwelle, in der Nyström das vibrierende Wesen der Raumzeit staucht. Auch die molekularen Kaskaden von Lucent Voids werden gelenkt durch Krümmungen und Verwerfungen, in denen in wellen- oder teilchen­förmigem Sirren und Brausen, metalloidem Schimmern oder submarinem Brö­ckeln die Dimensionen fragwürdig werden. Aber in genuin Fremdem scheint manchmal auch Vertrautes auf, Wasser oder Vögel, wenn auch exotische. Auch Cataract und Far-from-equilibrium variieren noch einmal Nyströms Ansicht, dass alle Dinge, klein oder groß, sich, und das auch nur unscharf, in ständiger ‘transformotion’ (sic!) zeigen lassen. Als prickelnd oder surrend fluktuierendes Rieseln von Molekülen. Mit knarziger Reibung in der Nahaufnahme, als raum­greifendes Star-Treking in der Totalen.

Als prickelnd oder surrend fluktuierendes Rieseln von Molekülen. Mit knarziger Reibung in der Nahaufnahme, als raum­greifendes Star-Treking in der Totalen.

Elettroacustica

Massimiliano Busti, Blow Up, no 204, 1 mai 2015

Kritik: Moebiusbänder und Kirchenglocken

Curt Cuisine, Skug, 9 avril 2015

Das hat einen gewissen Charme…

Love on the Bits

Fabrice Vanoverberg, Rif Raf, no 209, 1 avril 2015

Au premier abord, l’acousmatique de Erik Nyström ne sort guère de l’ordinaire, pour autant que ce terme puisse être appliqué à une sortie du merveilleux label canadien Empreintes DIGITALes. Chemin faisant, et passées les premières minutes, Morphogénèse subjugue par ses innombrables variations, complètement à l’opposé d’une vision où les drones se noient dans la monotonie. Tel un Markus Schmickler qui extirperait l’ombre de Fennesz sous le manteau de Robert Normandeau, l’œuvre du compositeur basé à Londres exploite à merveille une foule de registres des musiques électroniques abstraites, et sa force de conviction est telle qu’on se laisse emporter sans le moindre détour. Leçon numéro deux: aux trente premières secondes d’un disque, tu ne t’arrêteras pas.

Chemin faisant, et passées les premières minutes, Morphogénèse subjugue par ses innombrables variations, complètement à l’opposé d’une vision où les drones se noient dans la monotonie.

Kritiek

Sven Schlijper, KindaMuzik, 9 mars 2015

Biologische en kosmische oersoep.

Oersoep. Erik Nyström laat je luisteren naar het moment waarop leven vorm begint te krijgen. Naast de evolutie van klank en ruimte staat de genesis en afbraak van textuur centraal op Morphogenèse. Oersoep dus waarin geluiden rondschieten of clusters vormen en dan weer wegspatten als ze bij elkaar in de buurt komen. Een levendige mêlee die zoekt naar het moment waarop ze muzikaal wordt.

Nyströms zeer nauwgezette verkenningen vind je op het raakvlak van fieldrecordings en gecomponeerde elektronische muziek. Diepzeegeluid, zoals gekend van Jana Winderen, krijgt een compagnon in geluidkunstige exercities die raakvlakken kennen met Jacob Kirkegaard en Thomas Ankersmit. Denk: borrelen en pruttelen op biologische schaal versus Buchla-achtige sinusgolven en hypertechnologische patronen als next level minimale muziek.

Wat chaotisch en complex zou kunnen zijn, wordt in Nyströms handen verbazingwekkend behapbaar. Onder de pulserende zeespiegeloppervlakte en zeer zeker ook tot (intergalactisch) ver daarboven openen zich klankwerelden die ook voor de componist ontontgonnen terrein lijken te zijn. Alsof hij zelf verrast wordt door een plots opstekende onderzeewind, een spuitende geiser of een enorme imploderende gasreusster.

Alles kan nog in de primordiale toestand waarin Nyström componeert. Hij verwacht het onverwachte en schuwt gevaar niet, maar hij predikt zeker geen doem. Verandering is de enige continue constante in de vijf werken, die voortdurende beweging kennen. Netwerken ontstaan en verdwijnen, mutaties in flux zijn de modus operandi van deze levende muziek waarin harmonieuze synergie ontstaat uit anorganische elementen, als een groeiend klompje cellen dat zich in meerdere dimensies voortzet: organisch, biologisch én kosmisch.

… in meerdere dimensies voortzet: organisch, biologisch én kosmisch.

Recenzje

Łukasz Komła, Polyphonia, 3 mars 2015

Erik Nyström to szwedzki kompozytor mieszkający od wielu lat w Londynie. W swoich praca kładzie radykalny nacisk na przestrzeń oraz wizualne i fizyczne doświadczenia dźwiękowe, przy użyciu m.in. systemów wielokanałowych. Tytuł płyty Morphogenèse (dosłownie „przekształcenia”) nawiązuje oczywiście do badań nad geometrią bezkształtu prowadzonych przez francuskiego matematyka polskiego pochodzenia Benoita Mandelbrota. Kompozycje z „Morphogenèse” to przykład ciekawych eksperymentów gdzieś na styku akuzmatyki i elektroakustyki.

Review

Richard Allen, A Closer Listen, 1 mars 2015

Most albums are instantly accessible, their underlying concepts easily penetrable by the common public. Not so Morphogenèse, an album that travels from deep sea to deep space, searching for boundaries yet finding only greater expanses.

The track descriptions can be intimidating, so we’ll quote only one in this review. Erik Nyström‘s first sentence reads, “The title alludes to phases where sound is undergoing a process of molecular milling, fragmenting into its most primitive constituents, not unlike the ‘catabolic processes’ Rudolf Arnheim described in his essay Entropy and Art.” The artist is clearly not appealing to the average reader. For such (including myself), we’ll need a different tactic.

The title of the album can be broken into root words morphê (shape) and genesis (beginning), which makes morphogenèse “the beginning of the shape.” Nyström’s work is inspired by matter, space and sound as they evolve and/or decay. More importantly, his interests lie in the “novel organization of sound.” On this album, he executes his vision in a series of elaborate, extended movements.

The album is approachable not only despite its complexity, but because of it. These five pieces — none briefer than 12 minutes — may lack hooks, but they yield a clear sense of direction. Nature vacillates between the random and the ordered, and these compositions follow suit; while each changes shape as it develops, each has a chartable shape, from parabola to ascending line, suggesting later patterns like unfinished frames of code.

Nyström’s electronic bubbles and teeming drones imitate familiar sources: boiling water, steam hisses, lapping waves, buzz saws, wind. Some churn like magma; others erupt like hot spring geysers. An occasional bell strike offers a solid foothold on an occluded path; on Lucent Voids, brooks and birds contribute a sense of (adapted) reality. The repeated chords of Cataract yield the most recognizable form, yet even these change along the way. The components remain in motion, adopting new paths, imitating the black tributaries of the cover image.

These thickets of sound reflect unmapped territories, exuding promise and danger. It may have been difficult for Nyström to commit them to disc: a fixed form for the unfixed. In his mind, these works continue to mutate, like black holes expanding and imploding.

… these works continue to mutate, like black holes expanding and imploding.

Roxanne Turcotte & Erik Nyström — Einengung und Entgrenzung

Stephan Wolf, Amusio, 18 février 2015

Wie der bereits vorgestellte Robert Normandeau stammt Roxanne Turcotte aus Montreal — und veröffentlicht nach Amore, Libellune und Désordres ein viertes Album auf empreintes DIGITALes. Fenêtres intérieures kehrt anhand scheinbar lose texturierter Arrangements die Außensicht nach innen — und wieder zurück in die Erscheinungswelt scheinbar unbegrenzter Wahrnehmung. Der schwedische Klangforscher Erik Nyström verfolgt auf Morphogenèse einen umgekehrten Ansatz. Indem er unsichtbare Größen und Größenverhältnisse räumlich erlebbar macht, legt er die Amplituden fest (oder zumindest spürbar nahe) und fixiert somit den Nachvollzug.

Betont unverbindlich beginnt die Komponistin und Sound Designerin Roxanne Turcotte ihre Überlegungen zum Sinnbild der Fenêtres intérieures. De la fenêtre skizziert, vermutet und verwirft mit arbiträr flirrenden Andeutungen von Ortung und Ordnung ein sich sukzessiv der Sinnfälligkeit preisgebendes Vexierspiel, das „anfällig für extreme Sorglosigkeit und Leichtsinn“ (Roxanne Turcotte) bleibt. Das sich anschließende Bestiaire führt mit Vogelgezwitscher oder Regenwaldwald-Atmo eine Orientierung ins Feld, die spätestens bei Petit Ange den Klangraum für einen psychoakustisch wirksamen Dialog zwischen den nun identifizierbaren Protagonisten und dem Rezipienten eröffnet: „Je suis un personnage de cinéma“.

Endlich ist das Feld für einen narrativen Aufhänger bestellt, doch wird dabei vornehmlich und ähnlich subtil wie in den Filmen von Alain Resnais das Verhältnis von Ereignis und Kommentar, von Diegese und Parallelität verhandelt. Das Objet Volant Indentifié versinnbildlicht die trügerische Identifikation von Sound & Vision: Längst hat die Innensicht den äußeren Rahmen (Fenster) überfüllt, doch die von nun an markanter ausgerichtete Grundierung (Gitarren!) bietet der Wahrnehmung weiterhin immer wieder neue Bezugspunkte an.

Es mag von einem analytischen Standpunkt aus unerheblich sein, wie Musiksubjektiv erfahren und verstanden wird. Vielleicht sollte stärker als üblich vernachlässigt werden, was die Musik mit dem Hörer macht, sobald sie von ihm als Musik anerkannt wird. Wat den einen sin Uhl is, is den annern sin Nachtigall. Diese letztlich in die Irrelevanz führende Empfindungspluralität zu bändigen, kann als ein Versuchsfeld des in London tätigen Erik Nyström ausgewiesen werden, zumal er sich auf die Auseinandersetzung mit Texturen konzentriert, die ausgehend vom räumlichen Wahrnehmungsvermögen als allgemeingültig zu verifizieren sind.

Auf Morphogenèse unternimmt Erik Nyström den (anmaßend-mutigen) Versuch, elastische Topologien von sowohl figurativer als auch amorpher Natur (?) auf physikalische Erregungszustände anzusetzen, die zu einem „warp in a world of eternal genesis“ führen sollen, also zu einer vergleichsweise prosaischen Idealvorstellung eines gezielt ausgelösten Effekts.

Doch wie hört sich das nun an? Reduziert man die etwas zu kryptische Anhäufung von verbalen Theoremen, die der Komponist seinem Werk mit auf dem Weg gibt, auf die Belastbarkeit eines autonom Hörenden, so bietet Morphogenèse eine sensorische Erfahrung von Skalen, Graphen und ähnlichen Visualisierungen von Volumen, Dichte oder Dezibel, also von Werten, die letztlich aiuch nur einen Behelf zur Quantifizierung, eben, darstellen.

Das Schwellen und Schwären des Sounds, das Aufwallen und Abflauen seiner Gezeiten an akustischen Gestaden — es erweist sich als Hinweis auf eine räumliche Ausdehnung in potenzieller Unendlichkeit. Mit dem absoluten Nullpunkt (Stille) als einzigen Ausgangs- oder Anhaltspunkt. Das isolationistische Vergnügen an Morphogenèse ist in etwa so reizvoll, wie exklusives Wissen um Parallelwelten, vorausgesetzt, man darf es für sich behalten. Oder auch weitergeben, wie die Empfehlung dieses Albums.

Journal d’écoute

François Couture, Monsieur Délire, 1 décembre 2014

Ma première exposition au travail d’Erik Nyström, un électroacousticien suédois [vivant à Londres, RU]. Morphogenèse propose cinq œuvres dans les dix à vingt minutes. Abstraites et plutôt conventionnelles dans leur forme, elles s’intéressent par contre à un plasticisme sonore presque viscéral. Le brassage sonore, les mouvements décrits, les transformations auditives sont connectés à quelque chose de primal, sans tomber dans des émotions basiques comme la rage. Lucent Voids m’a transportée en m’amenant constamment à questionner le paysage qu’on me présentait. Bravo.

Le brassage sonore, les mouvements décrits, les transformations auditives sont connectés à quelque chose de primal […] Bravo.

Blogue