The Electroacoustic Music Store

Growl Åke Parmerud

  • Total duration: 65:17
  • UCC 771028213221

Sometimes proper composers make a ninny of themselves when they try and get “with it”, but Åke Parmerud has nothing to be ashamed of here.

— Ed Pinsent, The Sound Projector, Sunday, January 31, 2016

En tout état de cause, de la musique superbement faite et pensée.

— Kasper T Toeplitz, Revue & Corrigée, no. 106, Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Growl

Åke Parmerud

IMED 15132 / 2015

Some Recommended Items

In the Press

  • Ed Pinsent, The Sound Projector, Sunday, January 31, 2016
    Sometimes proper composers make a ninny of themselves when they try and get “with it”, but Åke Parmerud has nothing to be ashamed of here.
  • RVP, Gonzo Circus, no. 131, Friday, January 1, 2016
  • Kasper T Toeplitz, Revue & Corrigée, no. 106, Tuesday, December 1, 2015
    En tout état de cause, de la musique superbement faite et pensée.
  • Massimiliano Busti, Blow Up, Sunday, November 1, 2015
  • Fabrice Vanoverberg, Rif Raf, no. 215, Sunday, November 1, 2015
    Åke Parmerud est d’autant plus précieux qu’il est rarissime.
  • Rigobert Dittmann, Bad Alchemy, no. 87, Sunday, November 1, 2015
  • Fabrice Vanoverberg, Le son du grisli, Sunday, November 1, 2015
    Grandioses et comiques […] Jouissif…
  • Pedro Portela, O domínio dos deuses, Tuesday, October 20, 2015
    De tudo isto, em escombros, se faz a aridez de Growl!, cuja audição é uma experiência sónica extrema, mas absolutamente única.
  • Simon Cummings, 5:4, Monday, September 14, 2015
    … an absolute thrill, a seething, pulsing, fantastical blend of nature and artifice.
  • Pierre-Luc Senécal, EtherREAL, Wednesday, September 9, 2015
    … ce geste sonore infime est démultiplié, transformé en un torrent de bruit écrit de façon très sensuelle.
  • Richard Allen, A Closer Listen, Tuesday, July 21, 2015
    Growl is a fascinating disc, experimental yet accessible…

Review

Ed Pinsent, The Sound Projector, Sunday, January 31, 2016

Composer Åke Parmerud is from Göteborg, which is also the home of underground labels such as Fang Bomb, Release The Bats, and Beläten, names on which we can always rely to provide solid blasts of depressive post-industrial noise and drone music. Parmerud isn’t exactly cut from the same cloth, being as how he’s a prize-winning and classically-trained electroacoustic maestro, but there are moments of tasty darkness on his Growl (empreintes DIGITALes IMED 15132) collection which appeal to a macabre chap like myself. La vie mécanique, for instance, is a pretty effective critique of modern industrialisation, or at least an observation on it, and takes the hoary old dystopian cliché of “modern man becoming machine-like” and dusts it down for an update that involves samples of machinery blended with Techno music. In this lively composition of clattering beats and metal, it’s far from clear where the factory machines leave off and the dancefloor begins; it’s intending to convey something about the body being broken down into smaller units, much like the cogs of a machine being taken apart. Parmerud also makes a commentary on the contemporary use of machines (laptops, presumably) for making music. I wish he’d be a little less equivocal about it, both in his notes and his music, but it’s a nifty statement.

Maybe serious composers shouldn’t dabble with Techno. However, if you think men of Parmerud’s generation should leave the kids’ music alone, you’ll be even more appalled by the idea of Growl itself, where he drily observes “metal music is big in Sweden” from his lofty position, and borrows some ideas from his youngest son who plays in a metal band. This might be Aron Parmerud who plays his “axe” for Marionette, a Death Metal band who made a couple of albums for Listenable Records. What the composer has done here is zero-in on the throat-shredding vocals that characterise a lot of the music in this genre, and through arranging samples of voices shrieking “Hell Is Us! Die We Must!”, has built a virtual “growlers choir”. With the dark techno backing, electronic effects, and gloomy ambient tones, this works surprisingly well, even if it sounds too “expensive” and well-produced for a genuine metal album and has far too many interesting dynamics. He also misses the claustrophobia and genuine sense of doom. But even so Parmerud turns in a strong piece of work, and in any case he wasn’t setting out to produce a metal album.

What else are the “young people” interested in these days? Vinyl records, of course! So listen in to 2011’s Grooves if you want to hear what Parmerud can do when sampling the black stuff. The source material for this was the vinyl collection of his friend Kai Hanekken; in fact the composition seems to have been a by-product of a digitisation project requested by said Hanekken, who urged the composer to pick up the gauntlet and create a composition. He gave in. What gets sampled are run-out grooves and vinyl “noise”, i.e. crackles and clicks and such; Parmerud seems to have been only too aware that doing this was already something of a well-worn cliché, but again he liked the challenge and wanted to see if he could invert it and bring new life into the idea. Although best heard at high volumes and played back through a multi-channel system, Grooves still succeeds on your home CD player and delivers a suffocating density which is clearly one of this composer’s trademarks. Continuity is severely disrupted by the multiple edits, and the speed with which the layers of abstract noise pile up is incredibly alarming. You’ll feel like you’re trapped on an enormous spinning black disc of death.

Also here: 2014’s Electric Birds derived from birdsong samples (yet another instance where Parmerud had promised himself he would never make a piece like this), and Transmissions II, the most recent composition. It derives from a multi-media work where, if seen live, a singing choir are able to manipulate sound signals in real time. Some fascinating complex electronic layers result, and it sounds a lot more contemporary than some of the formal music that often gets released on this label, and is every bit as convincing as any given Mego release from the last few years. Sometimes proper composers make a ninny of themselves when they try and get “with it”, but Åke Parmerud has nothing to be ashamed of here.

Sometimes proper composers make a ninny of themselves when they try and get “with it”, but Åke Parmerud has nothing to be ashamed of here.

Kritiek

RVP, Gonzo Circus, no. 131, Friday, January 1, 2016

Critique

Kasper T Toeplitz, Revue & Corrigée, no. 106, Tuesday, December 1, 2015
En tout état de cause, de la musique superbement faite et pensée.

Elettroacustica

Massimiliano Busti, Blow Up, Sunday, November 1, 2015

Love on the Bits

Fabrice Vanoverberg, Rif Raf, no. 215, Sunday, November 1, 2015

Vétéran de la scène électroacoustique, Åke Parmerud est d’autant plus précieux qu’il est rarissime. Septième disque du sexagénaire suédois, malgré des débuts qui remontent à 1980, Growl (Empreintes DIGITALes) parcourt le temps des machines et l’impact constant qu’elles ont sur notre quotidien d’homme moderne. Avec ses atours robotiques et ses pulsations régulières, le premier titre La vie mécanique renvoie carrément à la motorique de Kraftwerk (et nul doute que si Ralf und Florian avaient un jour décidé de s’intéresser au genre, on les aurait retrouvés sur l’officine québécoise ED). La suite s’intéresse aux craquements du disque vinyl (Grooves, moins original), avant un étonnant et radical rapprochement entre la vie aviaire captée par Chris Watson et une électronique cosmique remodelée par Felix Kubin vs. Philippe Petit. Grandioses et comiques, ces Electric Birds. Qui disait que la musique électroacoustique manquait d’humour? D’autant que le suivant Growl dépote avec une envie fendarde tous les clichés vocaux de la scène métal. Jouissif, avant la conclusion un rien chiffonnée Transmissions II.

Åke Parmerud est d’autant plus précieux qu’il est rarissime.

Kritik

Rigobert Dittmann, Bad Alchemy, no. 87, Sunday, November 1, 2015

Love on the Bits

Fabrice Vanoverberg, Le son du grisli, Sunday, November 1, 2015

Vétéran de la scène électroacoustique, Åke Parmerud est d’autant plus précieux qu’il est rarissime. Septième disque du sexagénaire suédois, malgré des débuts qui remontent à 1980, Growl (Empreintes DIGITALes) parcourt le temps des machines et l’impact constant qu’elles ont sur notre quotidien d’homme moderne. Avec ses atours robotiques et ses pulsations régulières, le premier titre La vie mécanique renvoie carrément à la motorique de Kraftwerk (et nul doute que si Ralf und Florian avaient un jour décidé de s’intéresser au genre, on les aurait retrouvés sur l’officine québécoise ED). La suite s’intéresse aux craquements du disque vinyl (Grooves, moins original), avant un étonnant et radical rapprochement entre la vie aviaire captée par Chris Watson et une électronique cosmique remodelée par Felix Kubin vs. Philippe Petit. Grandioses et comiques, ces Electric Birds. Qui disait que la musique électroacoustique manquait d’humour? D’autant que le suivant Growl dépote avec une envie fendarde tous les clichés vocaux de la scène métal. Jouissif, avant la conclusion un rien chiffonnée Transmissions II.

Grandioses et comiques […] Jouissif…

Discos

Pedro Portela, O domínio dos deuses, Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Growl! não é fácil! Assim, logo de imediato, para não haver dúvidas ao que vem o sueco Åke Parmerud neste seu segundo álbum, cujo ponto de partida é sempre a mecanicidade dos sons da era moderna.

Este pressuposto de que o homem está exposto em permanência ao som opressivo das suas próprias invenções — que dominam o ambiente acústico e que causam o desconforto oposto ao objectivo de conforto que lhes está na origem — ocupa as construções sónicas deste álbum, feito de ruídos, rupturas, assincronias, estruturas complexas e de quase nada que se assemelhe a um formato estruturado de composição tradicional.

Repetições de ritmos a uma velocidade variável, microruídos de electrónica que parecem obedecer apenas à regra da aleatoriedade, sons de origem de difícil identificação em falência permanente, glitches analógicos de um qualquer disco de vinil, cantos de pássaros massacrados pela opressão eléctrica do processamento analógico. Tudo é matéria de construção sonora, imiscuída por sons de instrumentos, como o baixo ou uma guitarra que se aproxima do heavy-metal, mas sem que aparente haver um fio condutor que não o caos gutural de uma sociedade moderna em crise de finalidade.

De tudo isto, em escombros, se faz a aridez de Growl!, cuja audição é uma experiência sónica extrema, mas absolutamente única.

De tudo isto, em escombros, se faz a aridez de Growl!, cuja audição é uma experiência sónica extrema, mas absolutamente única.

New Releases…

Simon Cummings, 5:4, Monday, September 14, 2015

Swedish composer Åke Parmerud, celebrated with a disc of five works nicely titled Growl, takes an approach demonstrably informed by beats and loops. Sometimes he works with familiar materials, as in the clunking ratchets and hydraulic hisses that make up the palette of early work La vie mécanique (composed in 2004). But he turns to unexpected sources too; Grooves is a study in vinyl noise and crackle, rather lovingly woven into a dense tapestry of skittering pulses and clouds of interference (as such, it would make a nice companion piece to Philippe Petit’s Needles in Pain). Growl! opts for the unchecked ferocity of death metal, specifically its gnarled, inchoate vocalisational idiom, which Parmerud uses as the grain for a complex essay that becomes increasingly abstract, walking an unstable and somewhat whimsical line between pulse-rooted clarity and textural mayhem. The highlight is Electric Birds; electronic music has perhaps too often reached to birdsong as a source, but the breeds of exotica captured here (left largely untreated in the first half of the piece) are astounding, and Parmerud’s subsequent response to them is an absolute thrill, a seething, pulsing, fantastical blend of nature and artifice.

… an absolute thrill, a seething, pulsing, fantastical blend of nature and artifice.

Critique

Pierre-Luc Senécal, EtherREAL, Wednesday, September 9, 2015

C’est au printemps dernier qu’Empreintes digitales, le label de musique électroacoustique montréalais, annonçait une promo tout à fait alléchante. J’admets que mon cœur n’a fait qu’un bond en voyant cette offre exceptionnelle de 5 CDs pour le prix de 4, et la page n’avait pas finie de télécharger que mon numéro de carte de crédit était déjà rentré. Si certains oseraient juger cet excès consumériste qui m’a envahi, qu’ils sachent que les nouveaux arrivages du printemps avaient de quoi impressionner: des albums des compositeurs Åke Parmerud, Adrian Moore, Hans Tutschku, Gilles Gobeil et Georges Forget. En bref, une «attaque à 5» électroacoustique pour le moins exceptionnelle.

Afin de souligner l’occasion, j’ai invité un de mes collègues-rédacteurs, Philippe Desjardins du webzine Canal auditif (lecanalauditif.ca), afin de discuter de deux de ces albums: Growl du suédois Åke Parmerud et Le dernier présent du français Georges Forget. Privilégiant la formule «discussion informelle», nous vous présentons nos coups de cœur de montréalais. Une formule deux pour le prix d’un, ça fait toujours saliver, surtout lorsque la première est gratuite!

Pierre-Luc: difficile de décrire la musique de Forget sans parler de romantisme. C’est clair dès la première lecture de la note programme pour Métal en bouche. D’ailleurs, longtemps j’ai été hanté par celle-ci. Cette férocité, cette rage qui jaillit, et en même temps cette poésie qui sourd de la musique. C’est vraiment une très belle pièce. Cela dit, à force d’écoutes répétées, j’ai l’impression que la pièce aurait pu être encore plus sauvage.

Philippe: oui, la pièce se tient bien, mais je suis resté sur ma faim. Je m’attendais à plus d’impact, de contraste.

PL: ensuite, il y avait Une île, celle avec ses «craquements de bois».

Philippe: c’est ma préférée. Tu ressens pratiquement le volume du bois, même si je doute que ce soit bel et bien du bois dont il s’agisse. Malgré tous les traitements numériques, c’est impressionnant d’en arriver à quelque chose d’aussi organique, de simuler la sensation qu’on est à proximité de la matière.

PL: le début me semble un peu lent. C’est vraiment au 3/4 de la pièce qu’elle devient plus dynamique. Les impacts sont d’une grande énergie, et, tout d’un coup, la pièce devient très engageante. Orages d’acier suit un peu la même forme. L’attente se fait tout de suite sentir avant d’exploser à répétitions, et on se sent plonger dans l’œuvre d’Ernst Jûnger, des tranchées et des tirs d’artillerie, mais ce que je trouve fantastique, c’est le jeu sur les hauteurs. Il y a un sens de la mélodie, de la densification, du crescendo, et le tout est extrêmement musical… un peu comme un lied électroacoustique…

Philippe: et après ça commence à chanter! Pour moi, le chant de la fin vient briser tout ce que j’avais imaginé durant l’écoute. En un instant, je suis projeté dans une brasserie de matelots. La partie s’intègre peut-être bien dans la thématique, mais d’un point de vue strictement musical, je remets en question ce choix.

PL: il s’agit des Oies sauvages, un chant de la Légion étrangère française. Il y a peut-être un sens caché qui nous échappe, humbles Québécois… C’est peut-être très français comme décision! Enfin, j’aimerais conclure avec Seul et septembre qui est ma préférée. C’est sûr qu’avec des phrases lyriques passées dans un vocodeur, on fait dans le mignon, et c’est exactement pour cette raison que j’aime cette pièce. C’est tellement reposant et paisible… On écoute, et puis tout va bien. C’est une chanson d’amour que je ne peux qu’aimer d’amour, sans rationalité aucune.

Philippe: il y a une beauté très romantique à la pièce. Un plaisir tout simple, comme être étendu dans un pré… Tout le contraire de Growl!, la chanson heavy métal de Parmerud!

PL: c’est vrai, sa pièce pour quatuor vocal de chanteurs death métal! La signature electronica de Parmerud est très claire sur ce matériau «métal», qu’il a hybridé avec une bonne dose de techno. Je connais très bien l’univers du métal, et c’est curieux, car je ne trouve pas la pièce si métal que ça. L’idée me plaît énormément. La pièce a du souffle, et c’est peut-être la mieux composée de l’album, mais j’aurais souhaité plus de vitesse, et d’agressivité, et surtout de batterie déchaînée qui prend toute la place!

Philippe: j’ai bien ri dans les premiers instants de la pièce, mais ma préférée demeure la toute première pièce de l’album. Dans La vie mécanique, on comprend tout de suite comment Parmerud construit ses rythmes, omniprésents tout au long de l’album. Elle et Grooves, la 2e pièce, sont vraiment fortes, d’autant plus qu’elles me sont familières, car elles empruntent beaucoup de sonorités à des groupes du genre industriel: Skinny Puppy, Frontline Assembly… Il y a des références, des gestes qui semblent tout droit sortis de ces musiques.

PL: la fin de La vie mécanique est particulièrement prenante, et c’est clairement une pièce faite pour le concert, où les gestes sont magnifiés par la diffusion extrêmement active de Parmerud. Toutefois, Grooves demeure ma pièce fétiche de l’album. Le minimalisme de la pièce a déjà de quoi impressionner: 9 minutes de musique obtenues grâce au craquement d’une aiguille déposée sur un disque vinyle… Sous la main de Parmerud, ce geste sonore infime est démultiplié, transformé en un torrent de bruit écrit de façon très sensuelle.

Philippe: il y a peut-être un certain réconfort à écouter les craquements d’un vinyle. Comme un feu de bois.

PL: on parle souvent des mythes d’audiophile, comme quoi le vinyle sonne plus «chaleureux». Ça vient peut-être de là!

… ce geste sonore infime est démultiplié, transformé en un torrent de bruit écrit de façon très sensuelle.

Review

Richard Allen, A Closer Listen, Tuesday, July 21, 2015

What do birdsong, vinyl crackle, techno beats and heavy metal growls have in common? They all appear on Åke Parmerud’s latest collection. This seemingly disparate set of subjects unites to form a surprisingly coherent whole. The Gothenburg artist has defied the odds, still going strong at the end of his fourth decade in electroacoustic music. His natural curiosity (“I wonder what would happen if I did this?”) and playfulness (“Get me some growlers!”) combine to form a joyful experience.

Take for example Electric Birds, the bird composition that once upon a time, Parmerud swore he would never make. Birdsong is one of the most overused tropes in music (especially in ambient – enough already!), yet here the artist still manages to do something new. By isolating specific New Zealand species that sound like electronic instruments, he creates a piece that defies the ears. As he points out in the liner notes, the bass bird is tiny, but really sounds like a bass! While it may be possible that these birds have been dropping in on raves and imitating their sounds, it’s highly unlikely. When Parmerud starts adding electronic touches of his own, the shift is barely perceptible.

Now to another overused sound: the vinyl crackle. Ever since records first went out of style, nostalgia has produced a strange fascination with static, ironic because many of us are old enough to remember when crackle was a nuisance; we might even return a record and ask for a cleaner copy. A further irony is that the intrusive sound is now used as an inclusive sound, which itself is recorded to a different format. Parmerud’s “ultimate crackle” was initially designed for a 43-channel installation, and we are more than a little jealous of those who were able to hear it as intended; but the recorded version is still a beauty. Beginning (as might be expected) with the sound of a needle entering a groove, Grooves delves into multiple samples derived from countless home recordings, eventually overlapping them to a point that stops short of cacophony but is nonetheless effective. Of course this begs the question, “Can we get this on a record?” I for one would like to stagger these and play a few at once.

Now to the piece from which the album derives its title: Growl!. The artist sent his youngest son in search of some growlers (in the States, that would denote large jugs filled with beer) to help record a heavy metal composition. This is a lovely image in itself: “Son, fetch your dad some growlers from the corner market.” And wow, are these guys going to need some lozenges. “Hell is us; die we must!” they intone, among other unintelligible words. It’s a powerful piece, bristling with energy and pride; as the vocalists are all from Gothenburg, one can imagine this as a friendly competition that sounds (on the surface) anything but friendly. Raaaaaaaawrrr!

La vie mécanique includes only the sounds of various machines; it’s a factory gone wild, the type of music that by design is purely industrial. The first sound is that of winding, followed by ticks, rustles, whirs, and finally beats. Visually, one recalls Björk’s In the Musicals, from Dancer in the Dark, but musically, the track has more in common with modern techno, albeit with an early industrial base. A line can then be drawn to the album’s closer, similarly rhythmic although stemming from different sources, including an earlier choral piece and even parts of Grooves. It’s as if the composer decided to invite all of his friends to dine under the same tent, their subsequent conversation revealing their commonalities.

Growl is a fascinating disc, experimental yet accessible, a wealth of experiences collected in a single binding. At 62, most artists are running on empty; Parmerud still has a full tank.

Growl is a fascinating disc, experimental yet accessible…

Blog

  • The spring harvest at empreintes DIGITALes is impressive: Tutschku, Parmerud, Forget, Gobeil, and Moore. Get them all today for only $95 — a 24% rebate. A limited time offer. [Finished on August 31, 2015.]…

    Monday, May 11, 2015 / New Releases