The Electroacoustic Music Store

Contrechamps Track Listing Detail

Sustain

Adrian Moore

  • Year of composition: 2009-10
  • Duration: 12:26
  • Instrumentation: fixed medium

Variants of this Track

  • 5.1 • PCM • 96 kHz • 24 bits
  • 5.1 • Dolby Digital • 48 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • PCM • 96 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • MP3 • 320 kbps

Sustain began with an investigation into a pitch shifting transformation that produced very bright complex spectra. It also aimed to be somewhat ‘sustained’ in its growth. As further sound sources were gathered — including the sustained sound of wind noise — the idea of a relaxed dreamlike piece was shattered and something rather brutal took its place. Neither of the sounds mentioned could be tamed. Definitely a work where the content is not aptly described by the title! Whilst this work is predominantly abstract in nature, references to the natural world (open spaces, wind noise) help to tie the real to the imaginary.

[vi-11]


Sustain was realized from August 2009 to February 2010 at the composer’s studio and premiered on March 1, 2010 during the 20 years of musical innovation concert at PACE Studio 1 of De Montfort University (Leicester, UK).


Premiere

  • March 1, 2010, 20 Years of empreintes DIGITALes, Cultural eXchanges 2010: 20 Years of Musical Innovation, PACE Studio 1 — De Montfort University, Leicester (England, UK)

Fields of Darkness and Light

Adrian Moore

  • Year of composition: 2009-10
  • Duration: 10:23
  • Instrumentation: violin and stereo fixed medium
  • Commission: Darragh Morgan

Variants of this Track

  • 5.1 • PCM • 48 kHz • 24 bits
  • 5.1 • Dolby Digital • 48 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • PCM • 96 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • MP3 • 320 kbps
To Darragh Morgan

Fields of Darkness and Light is built upon a sequence of 13 chords. These chords, and their transpositions provide the harmonic structure over which the violin presents a number of themes. There is no real-time transformation of the violin sound. Instead the stereo ‘tape part’ is fractured into 100 small segments that are triggered by a computer performer. These fragments may form a drone (which may comprise many layers) or a dialogue with the soloist. Either way, this piece presents more of an opportunity for the soloist and computer player to work as an ensemble.

[v-11]


Fields of Darkness and Light was realized between October 2009 and February 2010 at the composer’s studio and premiered by Darragh Morgan on April 28, 2010 in Clothworkers Centenary Hall (Leeds, UK). The piece was commissioned by Darragh Morgan.


Premiere

  • April 28, 2010, Darragh Morgan, violin • Concert, Clothworkers Centenary Hall — School of Music — University of Leeds, Leeds (England, UK)

Surface

Adrian Moore

  • Year of composition: 2007
  • Duration: 15:22
  • Instrumentation: 7.1-track fixed medium

Variants of this Track

  • 5.1 • PCM • 48 kHz • 24 bits
  • 5.1 • Dolby Digital • 48 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • PCM • 96 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • MP3 • 320 kbps

Surface considers the changing nature of form versus content when dealing with small sonic elements dispersed in 3D surround space and reflects upon the concept of ‘environment’ in electroacoustic music (not to be confused with environmental sound in electroacoustic music). A ‘plausible sonic environment’ is one where elements and interactions are created in an object-oriented manner.

A sonic environment: latent forces obscured by a calm exterior wrestle beneath the surface and reflect the darkness within.

In Surface, objects of different classes were constructed and developed using associated resistive methods (small became large, high became low, fast became slow). The concepts of object oriented programming languages lend themselves well to composition in broadest terms (inheritance, encapsulation, polymorphism and recursion) and the concept of environment has long been used and debated in electroacoustic literature. It seemed appropriate to investigate these two ideas within the ‘soundworld’ of Surface.

As technology further enhances compositional practice, particularly in the spatial dimension, I wished to investigate how best to compose sounds within the 7.1 surround sound domain. My plausible sonic environments aimed to be immersive (filling the spectral and physical space), with sounds being given spatial behavioural characteristics so as to indicate collaborative group activity (ideas loosely informed by Denis Smalley’s extensive work on space; see Space-form and the acousmatic image in Organised Sound (2007), 12: 35-58).

My theory then (if it can be so called) was that the perception of a plausible environment can lead to a timeless impression — something which might remain after the work has finished. Better still; we can re-imagine the environment in our own time. There are no themes or sections — only brief pauses — and very little ‘imposed’ form; more a sense of immersion into (on this occasion) a dark and foreboding ‘world’ of sound. Nevertheless, I tried to give this environment a ‘natural’ feel. One could imagine standing knee deep in a lagoon as the mist clears in the early morning. Elements are obscured: they may be clouded by mist, or under water. They may approach by stealth. But the observer is not stationary all of the time and there are moments when the listener moves — changing the perspective of the whole environment.

[vi-11]


Surface was realized in 2007 at the composer’s studio and premiered on November 8, 2008 during the Soundings… festival in Reid Concert Hall (Edinburgh, Scotland, UK). This 5.1 surround sound version was realized in August 2010 at the composer’s studio.


Premiere

  • November 8, 2008, Soundings… 2008: Uma!, Reid Concert Hall — Edinburgh University, Edinburgh (Scotland, UK)

3Pieces

Adrian Moore

  • Year of composition: 2006-07
  • Duration: 25:29
  • Instrumentation: 5.1-track fixed medium

Variants of this Track

  • 5.1
  • 2.0

3Pieces comprises three abstract works based on recordings of violin, horn and piano which can be played separately or together. They were written as part of a collaborative creative event focusing around a horn trio. Originally conceived as ‘electroacoustic interludes,’ 3Pieces evolved into something much larger, taking in a research project exploring the nature of free play and improvisation within fixed medium works. As with earlier works, my concerns whilst composing 3Pieces were focused towards cataloguing and choosing usable material from a vast array of experimental sounds. Whilst methods involving improvisation with material may lend themselves to bricolage, composers of electroacoustic music rarely resort to something so serendipitous. However, it remains difficult to describe and justify the decision making process through anything other than the medium itself. I approached this problem from two angles. The first was to create a performance instrument (using a graphics tablet) that would possibly enable more ‘human’ interaction with material. The second was to begin to investigate recording, tracking and cataloguing the composition process. 3Pieces relies heavily on the former process. Whilst each piece is focused upon one instrument, the spectre of the ‘horn trio’ remains.

[vi-11]


3Pieces was realized in 2006-07 at the composer’s studio and premiered on March 20, 2007 during the Crossing Continents concert in Firth Hall of the University of Sheffield (UK). Thanks to Tom James (horn), and Peter Cropper (violin).


Premiere

  • March 20, 2007, Crossing Continents, Firth Hall — The University of Sheffield, Sheffield (England, UK)

3Pieces, 1: 3Pieces: Piano

Adrian Moore

  • Duration: 9:28
  • Instrumentation: 5.1-track fixed medium

Variants of this Track

  • 5.1 • PCM • 48 kHz • 24 bits
  • 5.1 • Dolby Digital • 48 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • PCM • 96 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • MP3 • 320 kbps

3Pieces: Piano draws upon a recursive chord sequence from my earlier Piano Piece (for Peter) (2004) and relies heavily upon regular repetition and drone.

[v-11]

3Pieces, 2: 3Pieces: Horn

Adrian Moore

  • Duration: 11:10
  • Instrumentation: 5.1-track fixed medium

Variants of this Track

  • 5.1 • PCM • 48 kHz • 24 bits
  • 5.1 • Dolby Digital • 48 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • PCM • 96 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • MP3 • 320 kbps

Dense textures resulting from developments of extended horn techniques open up in the surround space and lead to a number of ‘orchestral’ moments.

[v-11]

3Pieces, 3: 3Pieces: Violin

Adrian Moore

  • Duration: 4:43
  • Instrumentation: 5.1-track fixed medium

Variants of this Track

  • 5.1 • PCM • 48 kHz • 24 bits
  • 5.1 • Dolby Digital • 48 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • PCM • 96 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • MP3 • 320 kbps

3Pieces: Violin tries to be somewhat more subdued (though very reluctantly).

[v-11]

Rococo Variations

Adrian Moore

  • Year of composition: 2006
  • Duration: 17:22
  • Instrumentation: 5.1-track fixed medium

Variants of this Track

  • 5.1 • PCM • 48 kHz • 24 bits
  • 5.1 • Dolby Digital • 48 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • PCM • 96 kHz • 24 bits
  • 2.0 • MP3 • 320 kbps

Rococo Variations is an abstract work based around a series of synthesized harmonic transitions. After completing Dreaming of the Dawn, I was interested in animating basic / base harmonic material and disguising repetition with structural change. Rococo Variations began with a very simple (and melancholic) 8-bar harmonic passage (of whole notes). Working with pitches and harmonies in this way proved extremely challenging as synthetic voices, once recorded, were resistant to modification. Quite clearly, if a series of manipulations were possible, variation form was going to be one way of maintaining some coherence at the mixing stage.

The discrete nature of the notes / chords also provided a number of challenges. In addition to recorded MIDI files of the harmonic transitions, sequences were translated to Max/MSP enabling synthetic glissandi between chords, flexible duration control and dynamic timbral control of synthesis using a graphics tablet.

But why rococo? One possible transformation of the initial pitched material involved manipulating its harmonic spectra (perhaps making it inharmonic or animating the internal characteristics of a sound by glissandi). The graphic detail of certain sonograms was very intriguing. However, it would be foolish to ‘decorate’ the entire piece with these manipulations, doubly so to let this dictate the structure of the piece. But the idea of ‘rococo’ was set, especially influencing spectral and spatial manipulations in panning, granulation across multiple channels and convolution of drones with highly decorative material.

[v-11]


Rococo Variations was realized in 2006 at the composer’s studio and premiered on February 3, 2006 during the Soundings… festival in Reid Concert Hall (Edinburgh, Scotland, UK).


Premiere

  • February 3, 2006, Soundings… 2006: Concert, Reid Concert Hall — Edinburgh University, Edinburgh (Scotland, UK)