The Electroacoustic Music Store

Traces Track Listing Detail

Junky

Adrian Moore

  • Year of composition: 1996
  • Duration: 12:13
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium

Variants of this Track

  • 2.0 • PCM • 44 kHz • 16 bits

Junky is ‘electroacoustic ambient.’ The few discernible sound sources were quickly processed to form pitch and rhythmic motives in simple melodic and harmonic structures.

The work has three main sections — A (slow), B (fast), and A+B — with a coda and a more detailed structure of introductions leading to static passages, developments and returns in each of the primary sections.

The opening minute introduces the gesture-types and the pitch center of the work.

Many sound events appear, accelerate towards the ear and recede into the distance. One such event cascades into the first real occurrence of the dominant drone that contributes towards its ambient feel. As the drone becomes lighter section A proper begins.

Sweeping drone-like gestures act as cadence points for the essentially static experience of section A and pave the way for section B with its more aggressive material and continual stretching and compressing of a rhythmic device, into and out of drone. There is a clear pitch outline and a sense of stability remains.

A falling drone heralds the return section A+B where, through pitch alignment, both sound-types (drone and rhythm) merge, either sequentially or through mixing.

A coda ends the work.

[ix-00]


Junky was realized between April and June of 1996 in the Electroacoustic Music Studios of the University of Birmingham (UK) and premiered at the 1996 Dartington International Summer School. Junky received a Mention in the Musica Nova 1996 International Competition of Electroacoustic Music (Prague, Czech Republic).


Premiere

  • 1996, Concert, Dartington International Summer School, Totnes (England, UK)

Dreamarena

Adrian Moore

  • Year of composition: 1996
  • Duration: 13:13
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium

Variants of this Track

  • 2.0 • PCM • 44 kHz • 16 bits

Dreamarena is the second in a proposed series of ‘abstract’ works (of which Junky is a part). Whereas Junky has a clear form and simple melodic and harmonic structures, Dreamarena reverts back to more abstract electroacoustic material, shaping form continuously and using gesture as the primary means of communication. As the title suggests, the work presents a ‘dream arena’ where the listener is flying/observing.

[ix-00]


Dreamarena was realized in 1996 in the Electroacoustic Music Studios of the University of Birmingham (UK) and premiered at the Rumours… series in Birmingham in April 1997.


Premiere

  • April 1997, Rumours… 97: Concert, Birmingham (England, UK)

Study in Ink

Adrian Moore

  • Year of composition: 1997
  • Duration: 10:22
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium

Variants of this Track

  • 2.0 • PCM • 44 kHz • 16 bits

Study in Ink is a single-source piece: a recording of a marker pen on a whiteboard. Whilst writing on a whiteboard I noticed how, as the pen became dry, it began to make very interesting noises that could be used musically. (For many people this class of sounds is simply ‘noise’ to be avoided since the majority of the sounds of the marker pen lies within the 1,000 to 4,000 hertz frequency range; one of the more sensitive regions of hearing.)

After the initial source-recording process, the combination of tones and noises and their movement within the stereo field gave rise to quite complex material. With further equalization and sound treatment I obtained relationships of pitch, dynamics, speed and gesture. The pen moved from a wispy air-like sound through screeching tones and finally to a slip-grip grating sound. In developing this material, I turned to frequency-shifting to provide longer gestures over a wider frequency bandwidth. This hierarchy of gestures formed the basis of the work: long tones underpinning or overhanging smaller combinations of gestures.

The form of the work is centered upon moments of tension and relaxation, moments of joy and moments of sadness, but always tinged with a little humor. The fleeting gestures of the pen are contrasted with sections of imposed rigidity which include pulsed structures. The natural pitch-contour of the pen gives rise to some very human qualities such as sighing (descending gestures) and questioning (quick ascending gestures).

[ix-00]


Study in Ink was realized in 1997 in the Electroacoustic Music Studios of the University of Birmingham (UK) and premiered in 1997 at the Discoveries series in Aberdeen (Scotland). Study in Ink received the 2nd prize at the Hungarian Radio’s EAR’97 International Competition of Electroacoustic Music (Budapest, Hungary, 1997).


Premiere

  • 1997, Discoveries, Aberdeen (Scotland, UK)

Foil-Counterfoil

Adrian Moore

  • Year of composition: 1997
  • Duration: 12:20
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium

Variants of this Track

  • 2.0 • PCM • 44 kHz • 16 bits

Foil-Counterfoil continues the process of re-hearing natural sound-objects by investigating the sonic qualities of a number of different sources. Initially, tin foil was recorded with very close microphone positions (which reveals ‘hidden’ sounds). Rather than analyze the quantity and quality of material solely in terms of itself, I used other sound sources such as glasses, bottles and balloons to shed a different light upon the recordings of the foil, to ‘hear’ how I should work with the material. These new sources were able to merge with the foil spectrally (becoming part of a texture), and through individual gestures.

The point of the piece became the foil and its opponents. The title alludes not only to the idea of foil and an opposite, but also to the idea of the counterfoil being part of an original. The more obscure meaning of foil — to obstruct or frustrate — is perhaps hidden in the formal design, which is based on a continual process of deconstruction and reconstruction. The work was taken through many drafts in order to resolve its final form as defined by the interweaving of a number of similar phrases.

[ix-00]


Foil-Counterfoil was realized in 1997 in the Electroacoustic Music Studios of the University of Birmingham (UK) and premiered at Université de Montréal in 1997. Foil-Counterfoil received a Mention at the Prix Ars Electronica (Linz, Austria, 1998).


Premiere

  • 1997, Concert, Faculté de musique — Université de Montréal, Montréal (Québec)

Sieve

Adrian Moore

  • Year of composition: 1994-95
  • Duration: 13:14
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium

Variants of this Track

  • 2.0 • PCM • 44 kHz • 16 bits

Sieve is a ‘radiogenic’ work dealing with natural sounds and electronic manipulations of these sounds. The sieve is a process of separating material, information, sound and meaning according to need.

In listening to Sieve one builds a personal hierarchy of events which could be ‘musical.’ Often, sounds are not as we think they ought to be in that they exist in foreign soundscapes and are devoid of certain portions of the sound such as attack or decay.

If one forces listening at the wrong moment, the clarity of the listening experience changes and something ‘musical’ can sometimes be heard. For example, consider walking along the side of the road. Normally one would listen to cars when approaching an intersection and listen to the birds or the wind in the trees as one walks along the sidewalk. If this was reversed and we listened to the cars as we walked along the sidewalk and the birds at the intersection, our relationships to the environment would be changed, as our attempts to listen would be frustrated. (Not least by the likelihood of being run down!)

In Sieve, a huge amount of sonic data is thrown at the listener, who naturally is asked to make sense of it. For example: one is asked to compare interiors and exteriors by moving from a quiet living room to a town square. A morphology between the chimes of a small carriage clock and a church bell obscure the fact that this process is taking place. We are taken outside again later in the piece via a flushing toilet. Any metaphorical meanings suggested by the juxtaposition of sound events is just that: a suggestion.

[ix-00]


Sieve was realized during the summer of 1994 in the personal studio of Elizabeth Parker at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop and premiered by BBC Radio 3 as part of the ‘Between the Ears’ series in 1994. Sieve was funded by the Barry Anderson Trust. Thanks to Elizabeth Parker. Sieve received 2nd Prize at the Prix international Noroit-Léonce Petitot (Arras, France, 1996).


Premiere

  • 1994, Between the Ears, Radio 3 — BBC