The Electroacoustic Music Store

La notte fa Michel F Côté, A_dontigny

  • Total duration: 44:36

Drums & laptop. Then add a third ingredient to the first two: multiple samples. In La notte fa, Côté and A_dontigny have laid down sculptural music on a groove. Throughout these 10 pieces, the blender is on whip. This collaboration resembles an underwater stroll that ends badly. No foresight. They made this record on wasted time; the right thing to do. These days, wasting one’s time is worth more than the opposite. We invite you to do the same.

La notte fa

Michel F Côté, A_dontigny

ET 05 / 2008

Some Recommended Items

In the Press

  • Henryk Palczewski, Informator “Ars” 2, no. 51, Monday, November 1, 2010
  • Vincenzo Giorgio, Wonderous Stories, no. 17, Thursday, April 1, 2010
  • Mike Chamberlain, Hour, Thursday, March 18, 2010
    Côté and Dontigny piece together their aural constructions […] into strange and surprisingly accessible electro-dance delights.
  • David Grundy, Eartrip, no. 5, Monday, March 1, 2010
    One is left to conclude, then, that it’s best to avoid looking for comparisons, for generic references, as they’re pretty much useless in describing music that’s so determinedly askew, so schizophrenically active, so resistant to easy digestion and to standardised comprehension as this…
  • Rigobert Dittmann, Bad Alchemy, no. 65, Monday, February 1, 2010
  • François Couture, Monsieur Délire, Thursday, January 28, 2010
    Nice sonic work, nice energy, nice way to sound sloppy yet under control. Kudos!
  • Frans de Waard, Vital, no. 715, Monday, January 25, 2010
    Excellent discs, both of them.
  • Fred, The Muse in Music, Wednesday, January 20, 2010
    This is tinkery and inspired brain food, light on its feet, somewhere between sherry and chablis.
  • Marco Loprete, Kathodik, Monday, June 22, 2009
    la notte fa poteva essere un capolavoro. Così è semplicemente un buon disco.
  • Michele Coralli, Altremusiche, Monday, December 15, 2008
    Uno zibaldone di grooves sporcati qua e là da rumorismi attraverso cui tutto quanto può rientrare e che possono esplodere, comprimersi o interrompersi in qualsiasi momento senza che si perda la direzionalità complessiva.
  • Stefano Isidoro Bianchi, Blow Up, no. 127, Monday, December 1, 2008
    La notte fa è l’ennesima conferma di due talenti — e con loro di un’intera comunità di musicisti — dalle possibilità pressoché infinite.

Stadi di Ulteriore Follia

Vincenzo Giorgio, Wonderous Stories, no. 17, Thursday, April 1, 2010

Ne La notte fa (ovvero l’incontro tra due percussionisti (sic) “inquieti assai”, Michel F Côté e a_dontigny) viene preso in considerazione un substrato elettro-rock trasfigurato da un fitto uso di elettronica destrutturante (ad esempio Ritmi di oggetti ma anche le più soffuse Unlisted Card Number e soprattutto Paxil Origami Club) il tutto filtrato da una propensione addirittura “punk” (Bounce Dat ARN). Molto interessanti gli apporti degli ospiti Alexandre St-Onge (basso), Alexander MacSween (batteria) l’immancabile Bernard Falaise (chitarra) e soprattutto Jean René alla viola.

La medesima etichetta (&records) pubblica Sainct Laurens di Philippe Lauzier e Pierre-Yves Martel, opera di abbacinante introspezione timbrica dove i fiati (Philippe) e gli archi (Pierre-Yves) vengono dolcemente molestati da un’elettronica diffusa e soffusa. Nascono così piccole gemme come Brazos, Adda e Alz. Tre parole sussurrate nella penombra elettroacustica.

Spins

Mike Chamberlain, Hour, Thursday, March 18, 2010

Ritmi di oggetti, the first track on La Notte fa, is an orgy of stripped-down, fuzz-toned rhythm; the second track, Unlisted Card Number, is all textural dub ambient percussion; and the third piece, Paxil Origami Club, sounds like broken-down and refracted disco, with the flashing lights but minus the cheese. And that’s just the first third of the album. Côté and Dontigny piece together their aural constructions from fragments of pop culture with tapes and electronics, cutting up and reassembling samples from sources as diverse as Maurice Ravel, Don Cherry and Ol’ Dirty Bastard into strange and surprisingly accessible electro-dance delights.

Côté and Dontigny piece together their aural constructions […] into strange and surprisingly accessible electro-dance delights.

Review

David Grundy, Eartrip, no. 5, Monday, March 1, 2010

Jittery, cut-up music in which a barrage of samples — fragments of barely-recognisable speech, conventional instruments running a gauntlet of electronic distortion, snippets of grooves and beats that have been pulled and stretched and chopped to pieces — collide and (less frequently) cohere into a soundscape that can strike one at different moments as either fun, in a kind of crazy, sped-up way, or nightmarish, for pretty much the same reason. The starting point here would seem to be the more experimental moments of Autechre or Aphex Twin, with the tendency to repetitive, danceable beats knocked to one side to leave something which has a definite physical pull to it, but which isn’t going to make you dance to any sort of regular rhythm– rather, your stop-start spasms will give you away as a madman dancing to the disrespectful voices in your head. There’s no real question of ‘soloing’ here, or even of distinguishing between the various musicians, given the way that everything is mashed-up through electronics: the occasional beats which can be heard to come from a conventional drum-kit are soon overlaid with all manner of computerised sputters and run-away loops, and Jean René’s viola, which might have pulled things in a more ambient direction (à la Coil’s Moon’s Milk) is kept firmly to the bottom of the mix on his one contribution to the album. It’s rather like listening to a radio station with really fucked-up reception for an hour, the few moments of respite being provided through samples of Maurice Ravel’s Ma mère l’oye and a Don Cherry trumpet piece that appear, are toyed with, mangled out of recognition, and then discarded for the next set of electronic whirligigging. Another comparison might be the sample-overload of early Public Enemy without the (relatively) stabilising element of Chuck D and Flavor Flav’s vocals, which are at least determinedly about something: no such reference points here. One is left to conclude, then, that it’s best to avoid looking for comparisons, for generic references, as they’re pretty much useless in describing music that’s so determinedly askew, so schizophrenically active, so resistant to easy digestion and to standardised comprehension as this; music as chemical substance, hurtling through the blood-stream, sparking all sorts of strange, shuddering journeys through the brain.

One is left to conclude, then, that it’s best to avoid looking for comparisons, for generic references, as they’re pretty much useless in describing music that’s so determinedly askew, so schizophrenically active, so resistant to easy digestion and to standardised comprehension as this…

Kritik

Rigobert Dittmann, Bad Alchemy, no. 65, Monday, February 1, 2010

Max & Moritz enden erst zum Schluss in der Schrotmühle und im Gänsemagen, a_dontigny & Michel F Côté stürzen sich gleich mit den ersten Klängen von La notte fa (&05) selbst in einen Häcksler aus Tapes, Electronics, digitalem Signalprozessing, vor allem aber a_dontignys Cut-ups. Die spucken nicht nur Côtés Drumming und die von a_dontigny eingesetzten Drum-Machine-Beats verhackstückt wieder aus, sie spucken auch mit - unkenntlichen - Fetzen und Brocken von Don Cherry, dem Mahavishnu Orchestra, Ol’ Dirty Bastard, Maurice Ravel, Les Poules oder dem Soundtrack von Cronenbergs Videodrome um sich. In unterschiedlichen Kreisbahnen und Tempi wirbeln Klangfetzen als ein Mahlstrom, der einen selbst wie Treibgut zu erfassen droht, weil einem zunehmend schwindlig wird und man von giftigen, spitzen Rotationen gepiesackt das Gleichgewicht verliert. Die Welt ist ein hektischer, lärmiger Schlund, in dem rhythmische Kleinstteile umeinander loopen, ein gurgelnder, zwitschernder Abfluss, der alles in Reichweite schluckt. Frickeliger Drum’n’Bass ist im Vergleich dazu gemütlich ambient. Hier geht es noisiger zu, molekularer, mulmiger. Côtés Trio Klaxon Gueule geht schon in diese technoide, posthumane Stilrichtung, die Ego und Handschrift verwischt wie ein Gesicht im Sand. Identität bekommt etwas Geisterhaftes und Nostalgisches, wie Cherrys Trompete bei visiones nocturnae. Was da wie eine Parade von Nähmaschinen im Regen klingt, verbindet nichts mehr, nicht einmal surreale Zufallsbekanntschaften. Es wirkt wie pure Aktivität wild gewordener Automaten. Mehrfach besetzt Côté mit furiosem oder sturem Drumming das Zentrum, aber ohne Bindekraft, eher scheint er so die Fliehkräfte noch zu steigern. Ich sage das nicht kritisch. Das ist realistische und zeitgemäße Musik mit zeitgemäßen Titeln wie The Book Burner. Nur ich, ich war noch nie Realist, und zeitgemäß will auch ich immer weniger sein.

Listening Diary

François Couture, Monsieur Délire, Thursday, January 28, 2010

Wow, this is one fun, dirty collaboration between drummer/noisician Michel F. Côté and sampling artist a_dontigny (Aimé Dontigny of morceaux_de_machines). Explosions of drums, limping pieces, decontextualized audio quotes, irreverential games. It’s driving, intriguing, it’s trying to be ugly but it ain’t! Nice sonic work, nice energy, nice way to sound sloppy yet under control. Kudos! And La Notte Fa is totally in line with Côté’s latest recording projects, namely (juste) Claudette and Vulgarités, his duo with Isaiah Ceccarelli.

Nice sonic work, nice energy, nice way to sound sloppy yet under control. Kudos!

Review

Frans de Waard, Vital, no. 715, Monday, January 25, 2010

No doubt this label is in a lucky situation: the only mail arriving today where these two CDs, which included the 2008 release by Michel F Côté and a_dontigny, which is well beyond the six months that I usually have for accepting promo’s. This to avoid labels sending me complete back catalogues, and not because of being lazy. We know Et Records as a label from Canada with improvised music, but these two stretch the idea thereof. a_dontigny we know as someone from the No Type Records label with some highly charged musique concrete cut up music, whereas Michel F Côté is a known as an improviser on drums. That’s what he is playing here too, along with percussion, micros, tapes and electronics, and a_dontigny gets credit for cut-ups, drum machines and dsp. A bunch of (un-)invited guests also appear: Bernard Falaise, Alexandre St-Onge, Alexander MacSween and Jean René. I am not entirely sure how this was conceived, but I think this is the result of recording together some long night on drums and electronics, and then taking the recordings to the computer to effectively and extending mixing, chopping up, editing to create some wicked, crazy music. Hardly to be recognized as improvised music as such, this owes much more electronic music on one side and free rock on the other. Say Moha! or Rock Out but then a bit softer, a bit more structured and perhaps more electronic in their approach. Its however not an album that we can apply such words as ‘careful’ or ‘gentle’, as the music is a bit too mean for that. A high energy trip all around. Each track is in full speed mode, with tons of small sounds happening all around. One that doesn’t leave you untouched. One crazy fucked up form of improvised music.

The second release is by Philippe Lauzier on saxophones, bass clarinet, tubes and melodica together with Pierre-Yves Martel on prepared viola da gamba, two inch speakers, radios and contact mics. I assume, seeing this was recorded over a two day period, that this is a studio recording, which was later mixed by the two musicians, along with Dave Bignell. Improvised music of course, but quite an odd one. The nine pieces are relatively short and in a strange sort of way quite noisy. Strange because the bigger part the music is acoustically made, but with that bit of amplification that makes all the scraping sounds wandering off every now and then in the realms of feedback like sustained sounds, this is certainly not an easy work to access. Its however one, I think, that is quite beautiful. The sustaining sounds produced by what seem to be the main instruments (saxophone and viola) are already quite nasty, but in addition to whatever they are doing, this is a great work, totally demanding full concentration of the listener, but also totally rewarding. Excellent discs, both of them.

Excellent discs, both of them.

Find of the Week

Fred, The Muse in Music, Wednesday, January 20, 2010

We keep telling you: we don’t make the news. We just run it through Babelfish. Fatti maschi, parole femmine. All this is to say that La Notte Fa is a beguiling 2008 release, courtesy A_dontigny and Michel F Côté. The former is Aimé Dontigny of Napalm Jazz, and the latter, the gentleman pictured just left. […] This is tinkery and inspired brain food, light on its feet, somewhere between sherry and chablis. […]

This is tinkery and inspired brain food, light on its feet, somewhere between sherry and chablis.

Recensione

Marco Loprete, Kathodik, Monday, June 22, 2009

Era lecito attendersi qualcosina di più da questo disco di Aimé Dontigny (membro, assieme a Érick d’Orion del duo morceaux_de_machines) e Michel F Côté (batterista dei Klaxon Gueule). E ciò anche per via degli ospiti coinvolti nel progetto — Bernard Falaise e Alexandre St-Onge, rispettivamente chitarrista e bassista dei Klaxon Gueule, Alexander MacSween dei Foodsoon (batteria) e Jean René (viola) -, musicisti di straordinaria vitalità creativa, animatori, assieme ai due autori di la notte fa, della scena improv-rock canadese. Ma veniamo al disco in questione. Il lavoro di Dontigny e Côté si colloca nell’ambito dell’avanguardia più sperimentale. Un intreccio di batterie, percussioni, nastri, effetti elettronici, drum machines e cut-up di varia natura (tra i “prelievi”, svettano quelli da Videodrome di Cronenberg, The Mahavishnu Orchestra e Maurice Ravel) costituisce l’ossatura delle partiture improv-electro di ritmi di oggetti, unlisted card number, paxil origami club e naines qui gesticulent (due esercizi di frantumazione di breakbeat con avvolgenti suoni tastieristici a conferire un’atmosfera spaziale), bounce dat ARN, le jazzate lube liqueur e visiones nocturnae, target= "blank_" e the book burner. Pezzi a tratti indubbiamente affascinanti, ma che molto spesso cadono nel già sentito. La sensazione (ma potremmo dire: la certezza) è che Dontigny e Côté possano fare di meglio. la notte fa poteva essere un capolavoro. Così è semplicemente un buon disco.

la notte fa poteva essere un capolavoro. Così è semplicemente un buon disco.

Recensione

Michele Coralli, Altremusiche, Monday, December 15, 2008

Se lo spazio sonoro vuoto o l’idea di una prospettiva quasi geometrica, seppur costruita attorno a un affastellamento di suoni/rumori montati e rimontati, costituiva uno dei fulcri estetici di gruppi ormai totalmente votati alla costruzione digitale come i Klaxon Gueule, di cui Côté è membro, in questo La notte fa il batterista e manipolatore canadese assieme al suo partner Aimé Dontigny, altro manipolatore e turntablist, toglie ogni senso prospettico ai disegni sonori con una copertura di spazi realizzata attraverso ostinati e ripetitivi pattern ritmici, a volte montati in cut-up, a volte perfino programmati con un oggetto semi-vintage come una drum machine. Il risultato è un insieme di dieci brani molto processati e sintetici, nei quali può diventare anche stimolante ricercare i campioni (utilizzati previa autorizzazione) di Don Cherry, David Cronenberg, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Maurice Ravel e diversi altri. La grana complessiva comunque è molto ruvida, adatta cioè a un ascolto più emotivo, che razionale, in uno zibaldone di grooves sporcati qua e là da rumorismi attraverso cui tutto quanto può rientrare e che possono esplodere, comprimersi o interrompersi in qualsiasi momento senza che si perda la direzionalità complessiva.

Uno zibaldone di grooves sporcati qua e là da rumorismi attraverso cui tutto quanto può rientrare e che possono esplodere, comprimersi o interrompersi in qualsiasi momento senza che si perda la direzionalità complessiva.

Waves

Stefano Isidoro Bianchi, Blow Up, no. 127, Monday, December 1, 2008

Aimé Dontigny è il turntablist del duo morceaux_de_machines (con Érick d’Orion), Michel F Côté è il batterista dei Klaxon Gueule; gli ospiti del loro disco sono Bernard Falaise e Alexandre St-Onge, rispettivamente chitarra e basso degli stessi Klaxon Gueule, Alexander MacSween dei Foodsoon (batteria aggiunta in un brano) e Jean René (viola in un brano). Chi segue le vicende dell’impro-rock canadese sa che abbiamo a che fare con un grumo di musicisti che si collegano, scambiano e ritrovano in mille dischi diversi con formidabili capacità camaleontiche e dissimulatorie: in pratica riescono a suonare letteralmente di tutto e lo fanno con estrema nonchalance. Stavolta la coppia Côté-Dontigny propone un suono sfasciato e destrutturato — la masterizzazione è dell’esperto Paul Dolden: a quando un nuovo disco suo? — ma solidamente ancorato a una visione da ‘track’ ampia e accogliente, aperta ad input diversi e de/strutturata cum grano salis, facendo in modo cioè che restino linee maestre come se si trattasse della scrittura di autentiche ‘canzoni’. Tutto si basa nell’interazione di batteria-percussioni e cut-up da dischi e computer: Ritmi di oggetti, Jumping Off Minoru Yamasaki’s Building e Target="blank_" con l’impeto di grooves ottusi e nebbiosi, Unlisted Card Number come dialogo elettronico di glitch e microwaves, Paxil Origami Club e Naines qui gesticulent in astrazioni di breakbeat e galleggianti tastiere spacey, Bounce dat ARN e The Book Burner come impossibili out-funk alla Super_Collider, Lube liqueur e Visiones nocturnae disperdendosi in sublimi scie di filamenti jazz.

Un’operazione che può ricordare DJ Shadow in una visionaria versione impro-jazz-rock e senza la passiva dipendenza da culto del vinile: i cut-up sono sempre funzionali a se stessi e non meri ammenicoli da esporre con matematico scientismo, strumenti puri d’arrangiamento all’interno di un raffinatissimo modello di scrittura ri/creativa che ruota come una girandola mostrando sempre nuove facce e dettagli infiniti a ogni ascolto. Tenuto e trattenuto insieme dal collante di un’intesa perfetta e di una comunicativa a tratti persino vagamente ‘pop’, La notte fa è l’ennesima conferma di due talenti — e con loro di un’intera comunità di musicisti — dalle possibilità pressoché infinite.

La notte fa è l’ennesima conferma di due talenti — e con loro di un’intera comunità di musicisti — dalle possibilità pressoché infinite.

Blog